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Overview of the long history of boxing

Boxing has a very long history. Around 3700 BC, in Mésopotamie (ancient Greece) circulated boxing, the ancestor of boxing today. There was a time when this discipline declined, until it became popular in 1750 BC. Then, on the rest days, people often held the competition, with the participation of all classes.

The country of Greece has developed quite strongly in boxing competitions, even allowing opponents to be allowed to bring more leather or iron straps to their hands to take them down faster, because the competition law at that time was to fight.

When is a person unable to continue to fight?

By 746 BC, after Rome destroyed Greece, boxing was also transmitted to Rome with the enthusiastic response of the youth. However, as the development of boxing became increasingly ruthless, in 404 BC, the Roman emperor Theodosius the First made a complete ban on boxing.

Until the 16th century, ancient Greek – Roman boxing was a popular activity among the middle and upper classes of Britain in the revival movement. James became the king of boxing in England after defeating all other top players, and was the first to open a boxing school.

After that, a British next-generation champion, Jack Broughton, went further: opening a boxing school, inventing gloves to reduce accidents in competition, setting up a right-of-way rule.

By 1865, an English marquis, Queens Beery Vlll, had improved the rule of boxing to a more ingenious rule: only three rounds, three minutes each, instead of the sixteen rounds as Broughton rules. . Later Broughton rules became professional boxing rules and Berry rules became amateur boxing rules.

Since then, boxing has spread to many other lands on the planet. In 1881, the International Boxing Association was born, creating an opportunity for boxing to develop more widely. And in 1904, the Third Olympics officially classified boxing into official competitions.

Boxing today has developed around the world, famous for the technique of using only hands with three main attacks: straight punch, horizontal hook and hook up, plus the technique of using two moving legs combined with the body and head dodging.

In addition, boxing competition rules only allow the area to be struck in front of the body and from the waist up, forcing the boxing practitioner to practice even harder to gain. advantage in competition as well as in defense.

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Muay Thai or Boxing – Which Style is More Effective

Boxing involves hitting with your hands as well as foot and cardio vascular training. This type of striking requires quick hands and head movement to avoid being punched. Boxers have a more advantage of learning their martial art much faster because there is much less to master and much less to learn. Spending six months training Boxing you will be focused on punching and footwork, while in Muay Thai each month of those first six months will be spent trying to learn and master something new altogether.

Easier to Learn: Boxing

Which Martial Art is Better for Fitness?
Both Muay Thai and Boxing are great for improving fitness and cardiovascular strength. Even in their purest forms, both are great for strength and conditioning. There are sloppy western boxing coaches who don’t stress the importance of fitness in fighting, however if you’ve ever been in a professional or amateur competition you’ll know fitness is important. Muay Thai will also require you in hardening your body, particularly the shins.

It’s critical to remember that when the emphasis is more on fitness and strength rather than skills and technique you won’t have the attributes to properly defend yourself. Classes like “cardio kickboxing” are great options for losing weight and improving your body and heart, however they aren’t so good for self-defense and real life situations. Better for Fitness: Both

Who Would Win in a Fight?
So who would win in a fight between a Muay Thai vs Boxing practitioner? Luckily for us this strange fight has taken place at least once or twice before.
An important thing to notice is that this was under a professional competition, real life situations and other professional fights won’t always be the same as this way.

Which Martial Art Should You Train?
Boxing and Muay Thai are different martial arts, so when it comes to training the question isn’t essentially about which fighting style is better. It’s more about which martial art is more appropriate to you personally. Do you want to just concentrate on punching or do you want to add kicks, knees, and elbows

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Muay Thai or Boxing – Which Martial Art is Better for Self-Defense?

When it comes to self-defense and various real life dangerous situations, both Boxing and Muay Thai are great martial arts to practice. Boxing will probably get you into defensive position and competence a lot quicker in most situations, as the focus it puta on timing, spacing, and reading your opponent use of hands. Every fight begins with standing up and Boxing is one of the best skills to have in a fight with your hands.

Muay Thai will teach you how to read opponent leg’s movements. Most self defense situations do not necessarily require this skill, but when you meet an opponent who can kick, this gives a high chance of ruining whatever strategy you had in place with boxing.

Training Boxing enables you get much more proficient in self-defense in the short term (approximately 6 months training time). However, Muay Thai training emphasizes on he clinch and have a longer striking range.

Therefore, if you aim for Short term self-defense, choose Boxing and Long term self-defense choose Muay Thai.

Which Martial Art is Easier to Learn?

When you compare the two arts, both Boxing and Muay Thai can be easy and hard at the same time depending on which aspect of training you’re following.

Muay Thai involves the use of all striking points through elbows, knees, kicks, and punches. This type of striking takes a much longer time to master when compared to just using one form of attack. Not only do you need to learn how to master these type of strikes, but you also have to learn to master defending against these type of strikes. There is no Muay Thai professional that does not  know how to properly defend a low kick. Muay Thai clinching is also vitally critical to learn and that takes a long time to master.

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Muay Thai or Boxing – Which Style is More Effective? (Part 1)

It’s a common question that everyone asks “which martial art is better”. No matter you have been practicing some forms of martial arts for years, or if you’re a beginner looking to find the best martial art to begin with, you will be able to find your answer from this martial art breakdown. The truth is, a majority of martial arts are excellent and it’s silly to compare them with each other, it’s like comparing apples to oranges which hold their own beauty.

In this article, we are about to compare Boxing vs Muay Thai. Both of them are super useful for attacking, striking and self defense, and both are absolutely worth to learn. The question we want to answer is which out of the two martial arts are better for self defense, and which one is more powerful and practical for real-life situations.

Muay Thai vs Boxing

Boxing and Muay Thai share some similarities, as well as many differences. Muay Thai consists of some elements of boxing, however you can’t fight as a boxer when you practicing Muay Thai otherwise bad things will happen. Same applies for Muay Thai in a Boxing match, they are two completely different forms of martial arts with distinct advantages and disadvantages.

Muay Thai is useful because it brings a great advantage on the range and separation to the opponent. If a Muay Thai fighter fight a boxer in the street, he would have the advantage over his opponent of front kicking to keep him at distance. However, a Muay Thai fighter isn’t as strong with his hands as a boxer. A Muay Thai fighter would actually get a huge advantage in street fight, which is something that can’t be replicated by practicing boxing.

Boxing is useful because it holds advantage with footwork and self-defense. If a boxer were to fight a Muay Thai fighter in the street, chances are he would be able to easily avoid punches which can’t be compare in terms of strength. The main problem with Boxing is that boxers focus only on striking with hands, while Muay Thai focuses on both hands, elbows, feet, and knees

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Ranking the Most Unbreakable Records in Boxing (Part 4)

The Most Bouts and Wins in a Career: Len Wickwar

This record is quite hard to determine with precise accuracy. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, boxing was banned outright in some areas as an outlaw sport and had to be presented as “an exhibition” in some others.
So determining the complete records for boxers is not completely possible.

But by combing through newspaper archives with the most accurate database possible, it shows that lightweight Len Wickwar had the most verified professional fights and the most wins in a career.

Between 1928 and 1947, Wickwar compiled a record total of 467 fights which is the records that almost impossible be touched.

The Most Knockouts in a Career: Archie Moore
This is another record that is well out of the scope of contemporary prize possible for fighters. In a career that lasted three decades, “The Old Mongoose” Archie Moore was considered as a top-rated fighter from middleweight to heavyweight and won 183 professional fights, 131/ 183 by stoppage.
Moore was a crafty veteran who grew his power with him as he went up in weight categories. He is arguably considered as the greatest light heavyweight to ever live and has been held the title for the last decade of his career, while ranking at the top of the heavyweight division in his spare time.

Moore is also the only fighter to have competed against both Muhammad Ali and Rocky Marciano.

The Most Titles Held Concurrently in Different Weight Classes: Henry Armstrong
Besides Sugar Ray Robinson, Henry Armstrong is only one truly valid alternative: as the greatest pound-for-pound fighter to ever live. For a short period of time in 1938, Armstrong dominated as the undisputed world champion at 3 divisions of featherweight, lightweight and middleweight, all at the same time. In the time when there was only one world champion per division, Armstrong was the unquestioned king from division of 126 to 147 pounds.

To put that into context, in today’s era of titles and half weight classes, there could be up to 20 “world champions” at any given time, covering the same weight division.

Remarkably, in 1940 Armstrong battled against middleweight champion Cerefino Garcia. A win would have made him a world champion in four divisions during the time when there were only eight divisions.

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Ranking the Most Unbreakable Records in Boxing (Part 4)

Most World Titles Won in Different Weight Classes: Manny Pacquiao
Manny Pacquiao’s fans have the tendency to make a great deal out of his world titles in eight divisions. Claiming it is proof that he’s the greatest pound-for-pound boxer of all time.

That’s a huge overstatement as in today’s alphabet soup era, world titles are pretty easier to come by than they used to be in previous eras. And Pacquiao’s light middleweight belt was achieved at a catchweight of 150 pounds, four under the true light middleweight limit.

Still, it’s a remarkable achievement and the one that is unlikely to be matched or surpassed. To put it into context, Pacquiao got his first world title at 112 pounds division. That means he increased 38 pounds, over a third of his body weight, to get his heaviest title. 

Most Times as Undisputed Heavyweight Champion: Muhammad Ali
Evander Holyfield has won the world heavyweight title five times, and that itself will be a hard record to beat. Holyfield used to be very good for a long time, in a very severe division, to get that record.

But the even more unbreakable record is Muhammad Ali’s achievement as the undisputed heavyweight champion. It’s hard enough to become an undisputed champion in today’s era of alphabet soup, let alone to reign three times.
To do it, Muhammad Ali won Sonny Liston in in 1964. Years later, he beated George Foreman to become the second man to regain the heavyweight crown, comes just after Floyd Patterson.
After losing the belt to Leon Spinks in a match in 1978, Ali won the title in an immediate rematch.

Longest Unbeaten Streak: Jimmy Wilde
Nicknamed “The Might Atom,” Welshman Jimmy Wilde is believed as one of the greatest flyweights ever and one of the leading boxers the United Kingdom has ever had. Between his professional debut in 1910 and his first loss in 1915, Wilde established an unbeaten streak of 103 fights.

Of course, many of these fights were fought in obscurity and none of them were hosted outside of the U.K. Without doubt the most impressive unbeaten streak in boxing history belongs to Sugar Ray Robinson.

After taking his first loss to Jake LaMotta in 1943, Robinson had winning streak until 1951. During that time he gathered the welterweight and then middleweight titles while going undefeatable in 91 straight fights.

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Ranking the Most Unbreakable Records in Boxing (Part 2)

The Longest Two KO Streaks: Carlos Zarate
Only a rare number of boxing stars have achieved exceptional knockout streaks of over 20 fights. Bantamweight wrecking machine Carlos Zarate is the only boxer to have been able to record two such streaks.

Zarate won his first 23 fights by stoppage. Following by a decision victory, he won by knocked out his next 28 opponents. During his second streak, he got the WBC bantamweight title and also won by knocked out Alfonso Zamora, who was also in the middle of achieving a 20-plus KO streak.

Zarate’s streak finished in appropriate fashion, against fellow knockout boxer Wilfredo Gomez, when Zarate decided to super bantamweight to challenge for the title. Between the two of them, Gomez and Zarate entered the combat with a combined record of 73-0-1 with 72 KOs. Eventually, Gomez prevailed, stopping and Zarate won in five.

The Oldest World Champion: Bernard Hopkins
Bernard Hopkins is the reigning WBA and IBF light heavyweight winner amd about to turn 50.

Hopkins is the oldest winner in boxing history, as well as the oldest professional athlete to compete at such a high level. Most elite professional boxers are made up  their training schedule from mid-to-late 30s.

Hopkins’ longevity is critical to his disciplined training and conditioning over the last years, and to his style, which has eliminated the damage he has put out. But he’s also began claiming that he’s an “alien” lately, and perhaps there’s something to that.

We are about to ready to begin considering science-fiction explanations for Hopkins at this point.

Hopkins faces the ferocious WBO champion Sergey Kovalev in November which made it a dangerous fight for anybody, including the 49-year-old man. But if ever it were possible for a person that age to compete against a monster like Kovalev, Hopkins is the one.

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Ranking the Most Unbreakable Records in Boxing (Part 1)

A lot of boxing records are phenomenal with certain milestones are till now untouchable. Just as nobody will ever be able to forget Cy Young’s total of 511 wins or come close to Len Wickwar’s 468 professional bouts.

It might seems that breaking other records is feasible, but still seems unlikely till now. It isn’t impossible to break the record of Joe DiMaggio’s 56-game hitting streak or Manny Pacquiao’s world titles in eight different divisions.
These are the top boxing records that are very difficult, to surpass. 

10. Youngest World Champion: Wilfred Benite

In March 1976, Wilfred Benitez won the WBC light welterweight title from Antonio Cervantes at just 17 years old to become the youngest champion in history. He was still six months away from turning 18 with high school classmates sitting in the front row cheering him up.

It would almost certainly that a case of a flyweight or lower from the Asia-Pacific or Latin America countries might break the record. But might be in a far far future. In Benitez’s case, he won and hold the title for almost a decade in a historically competitive weight against many all-time great in the category. Benitez later moved up, attempting to win the welterweight title, but lost to Ray Leonard. In May 1981 he defeated Maurice Hope to win the light middleweight title, and became the youngest champion in history that win in three-division.

9. Longest KO Streak with a World Championship: Wilfredo Gomez

There have been many longer KO streaks but none of those fighters became world champions. Following draw in his professional debut, Gomez defeated the next 32 opponents in four years of stretch to reign the WBC super bantamweight champion.

After taking his record with 32 KOs, Gomez moved up to featherweight to challenge Mexican legend Salvador Sanchez and took the first loss of his career.

After which, Gomez won eight more in a row by stoppage, including the first unanimous decision over Juan Laporte.

Before retiring, he won a third world title at super featherweight and become the greatest Puerto Rican star of all time.

Deontay Wilder is currently in striking distance of this record, with 32 straight KOs. But he’s yet to fight a true contender, let alone win a championship, while Gomez recorded the last 13 KOs of his streak in world title fights.

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Boxing Weight divisions

During the 19th and the early 20th century, the popularity of boxing brings about the establishment of weight divisions which features other classes beside the heavyweight class to eliminate the handicap of smaller contestants’ having to compete with excessive weight opponents. Some of these weight divisions came from the United States while many others come from Great Britain.

There were initially eight weight divisions in men’s boxing before more divisions were included, and professional governing bodies now acknowledge a total of 17 weight classes, which had their current names after the major boxing organizations in 2015. The upper limits of these classes are determined as follows:

minimumweight, light flyweight, flyweight, super flyweight, bantamweight, super bantamweight, featherweight, super featherweight, lightweight, super lightweight, welterweight, super welterweight, middleweight, super middleweight, light heavyweight, cruiserweight, heavyweight, and unlimited

In all world and national title fights, weight limits must be strictly managed, although boxers are often allowed by contract to scale the day before a fight. If a boxer is over the limit of the class he intended to fight, he is normally given time to make the stipulated weight. If he fails, the bout is proceeded, but if the overweight fighter wins the bout, the position in the fight he intends to join is declared vacant.

In Olympic amateur boxing event, the weight divisions for men are as follow:

light flyweight ( weight not more than 108 pounds (49 kg), flyweight, bantamweight, lightweight, light welterweight, welterweight, middleweight, light heavyweight, heavyweight, super heavyweight, and any weight over 201 pounds (91 kg)

There is no strict agreement on weight divisions of women’s professional boxing, but amateur weight divisions are agreed as follow:

flyweight (weight not more than 106 pounds), bantamweight, featherweight, lightweight, light welterweight, welterweight, middleweight, light heavyweight, heavyweight, super heavyweight, any weight over 179 pounds (81 kg)

Women’s Olympic boxing is divided into three weight classes as follow

flyweight, lightweight, and middleweight

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Biggest Stars in Boxing Today (Part 2)

3. Wladimir / Vitali Klitschko

While not widely popular in the United States, in Europe Wladimir / Vitali Klitschko

are legitimate rock stars, featuring huge TV ratings every time they having a fight, especially in Germany. The Klitschko brothers’ fights always routinely sold out over football, something almost no other US fighters could do. 

Wlad and Vitali have incredible earning power all over Europe, especially after Wladimir fight against David Haye which was a true worldwide event with thousands of viewers in about 150 countries.  

While they aren’t the most beloved fighters of the US, they are still very famous to most boxing fans. Despite not liking their style, many admit that they still will tune in and watch every of their fights, no matter who they are up against. 

2. Floyd Mayweather

It was hard deciding the position for Floyd Mayweather between No. 1 and No. 2. Floyd is very arguably king in the sport because his fights do huge numbers and are always big news but his family is both intriguing and funny, which make us love to watch and see what happens whenever they get together. Through the HBO show 24/7, Floyd has become a household name. 

Floyd’s personality is definitely a reason for his popularity as his boxing skills. He talks about HUGE game outside the ring, and backed it up inside by great performance. Floyd Mayweather is truly a star in boxing today. 

1. Manny Pacquiao

Manny Pacquiao and Floyd are pretty much equal in terms of PPV numbers and reputation in the United States, but in terms of worldwide popularity, Manny is over the edge. Although Floyd is very famous outside the US, but he’ll never get the same admiration as Manny has. Manny is the most famous athlete, singer, actor, politician, and so much more in his home country – the Philippines.